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Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine

Yesterday was, perhaps, the most expensive day, so far, in this trip.  

Today, I visited and strolled the huge Meiji – Jingu, a Shrine surrounded with more than a 100,000 trees. In the middle of this lush urban forest is a simple, yet, elegant shrine to honor the former Emperor Meiji and his beloved Empress. 

JAPAN IS THE LAND OF THE RISING SUN

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo,

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

When entering the park, visitors have to pass below a gargantuan, tall, wooden torii gate. Though the sun was up, the place was kind of warm and cool. You can avoid the searing heat by walking under the shades. 

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

In summer, the Shrine can be crowded at most time of the day, especially on weekend. However, since the area is so huge, you can still find a place where it’s tranquil and do your thing.

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

When inside, don’t miss the Meiji Jingu Treasury House and the Inner Garden which you would be required to pay for a minimal fee.  

TRADITIONAL JAPANESE WEDDINGS

If you are lucky, like me, you’ll be able to see a traditional Japanese Wedding Ceremony in Meiji-Jingu. During my stroll there, I saw three wedding ceremonies. At first, I thought it was kinda stage or cultural performance for the local and foreign tourists but when we followed them right inside the temple, we were told that it’s only for members of the entourage who can go inside.

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

In the picture below, it’s a lovely sight how Japanese put emphasis on the positions of each person in the photograph. The arrangement has to be perfect and it took 15 minutes until everyone were properly posted in their respective places. Men were in suit while some girls wore the traditional Japanese kimono or something formal. The closer you are to the bride and groom, the more important you are to them and the family, maybe? But, for sure, the first tier would be their parents and family. This looks like a class pictorial, right? 

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

We, the tourists was fascinated into the details of the bride’s kimono as seen in the photo below. While the bride was busy following directions from the cameramen and photo director, the groom was patiently waiting in the corner with his phone. I suspected that he was playing tetris. LOL….

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo. A Japanese bride in her fabulous kimono.

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

Below is the traditional wedding march from inside the Shrine. They pass the courtyard and onto another Shrine. I reckon that the two women in front of the bride and groom are the bride’s maids?

Check this traditional Japanese wedding video from Meiji – Jingu Shrine.

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

WISH BOARDS 

One thing you should check out when you are in Meiji Jingu Shrine is an area where visitors can wishes on a piece of wood for 500 yen. You can write everything you wish for yourself, family and even for other people. Before buying my own piece of wood, I read a mother’s wish for her son to stop using drugs. Touching.

Below is my wish.

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine in Tokyo.

KABUKIZA

After visiting Meijin Jingu Shrine, I went to a Kabukiza Theater in downtown Tokyo.

Warning: Don’t go. 

I was bored to death and the rest of the 9 foreigners seated near me. It could have been more interesting if there was a translation on screen but there was none.

Beijing is doing it in their Beijing Opera—so, why not Tokyo?

For 700 yen, we were seated sooooooo far away from the stage and it’s way up, up, up, there. It was like we were watching mini statues moving and shouting stuff we couldn’t understand.

There was even no flyer or a libretto distributed at the ticket counter or anywhere in the venue. It sucked big time. Literally, we were sleeping. In fairness, the production and costume designs were fantabulous! If you wanna see Japanese kimonos and other ancient stuff, then see and just cover your ears with your ipod earphones.

Most people in the 700 yen seats did NOT return after the break.

Boring.

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One Response to “Traditional Japanese Weddings at Meiji Jingu Shrine”

  1. nintendo dsi r4
    November 14, 2009 at 7:11 AM #

    They all look ver amazing and beautiful I thought somewhere it is funny.

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