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Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum

In my previous post, I showed you the facade of the stunning Roman Colosseum. Now, I’ll bring you inside to see what it’s like while learning a bit of its history. This piece of architectural wonder is a must see when you’re in Rome. Don’t skip it, or else, no one would believe you’ve been in Rome or you’ve been where the gladiators used to fight.

Related: The Beauty of the Roman Colosseum Facade

Let me just tell you that the quality of the photos below aren’t that good enough for me. I took it with my iPhone 6s+ (sorry Apple!) after I accidentally damaged my tiny Canon camera. But, then, you know, you’ll get the whole picture of what’s inside the Colosseum.

The Roman Colosseum is also known as Flavian Amphitheatre.

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

It is the world’s largest amphitheater (round theater) that can hold 50,000 spectators.

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

But contrary to what we all assume – the Colosseum isn’t round but oval in shape.

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

There are 80 entrances inside the Roman Colosseum but only a few are being used today.

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

You’d be surprised to know that this stone and concrete wonder was built by 60,000 Jewish slaves.

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

In Ancient Rome, the Colosseum was used for gladiatorial fights, wild animals huntings and other sporting events. 

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

This may sound weird but this same colosseum also hosted naval ship battles. How? They flooded the Colosseum with water, of course! 

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

For 390 years, it was used as an entertainment arena where most events were free for all. 

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

It is reckoned that about 400,000 people died in here. 

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

And if PETA existed long time ago, they won’t be happy to know that about a million animals died in the name of entertainment.  

Take a Peek: Inside the Colosseum in Rome (Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Colosseum in Rome (Italy).

Do you what would happen to the fate of those who lost the gladiatorial battles? They could only hope to be pardoned by the emperor, or the spectators, saving their life. 

Take a Peek: Inside the Colosseum in Rome (Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Colosseum in Rome (Italy).

Most combat participants were slaves and prisoners but it’s also open to free individuals seeking fame and fortune. 

Take a Peek: Inside the Colosseum in Rome (Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Colosseum in Rome (Italy).

Every Good Friday, the Pope continues to hold a procession here to honour the memory of the Christian martyrs believed to have died in here. Perhaps, that explains the cross at one of the entrances at the Colosseum.  

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Roman Colosseum (Rome, Italy).

Despite numerous earthquakes and fires, the Colosseum still stood today. Though it looks battered and ruined, its majestic beauty still shines through. 

Take a Peek: Inside the Colosseum in Rome (Italy).

Take a Peek: Inside the Colosseum in Rome (Italy).

Where to Stay in Rome – Hostel in Rome

Hostel Alessandro Palace and Bar is your best bet in Rome. This hostel exceeded my expectations. The spacious rooms are secured with magnetic key cards and equipped with safe lockers for your valuables. You have to bring your own lock though. If you forgot to bring one, you can always buy one in their vending machine downstairs. They also have a bar that serves your alcohol needs. The staff are friendly and speaks English, too. The area has a lot of cafes, restaurants and grocery shops. The Roman Colosseum is 30 minutes and the Trevi Fountain is 20 minutes walk from here. But, most of all, it’s less than 5 minutes walk to the Rome Central Station. Trains to the airport and to another parts of Italy start and end in this station. You can book Hostel Alessandro Palace and Bar in Rome via HostelWorld and Booking.com.

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